Worldviews, Science and Us: Bridging Knowledge and its Implications for our Perpectives on the World.

TitleAn Interdisciplinary Focus on the Concept of Causation: What philosophy can learn from psychology
Publication TypeBook Chapter (with title)
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsDe Vreese, L
Secondary AuthorsAerts, D, Broekaert, J, D'Hooghe, B, Note, N
Book TitleWorldviews, Science and Us: Bridging Knowledge and its Implications for our Perpectives on the World.
Pages55-71
PublisherWorld Scientific Publishing Company
CitySingapore
Abstract

In philosophy of science, it is still a mainstream practice to search for the `truth' about fundamental scientific concepts in isolation, blind to knowledge achieved in other domains of science. I focus on the topic of causation. I argue that it is worthwhile for philosophy of science to leave its metaphysical tower in order to pick up knowledge from other domains where empirical research on causal reasoning is carried out, such as psychology. I will demonstrate what the psychologist Peter White's theory, on the origin and development of causal reasoning, can impart to philosophy of causation. It concerns different but interre- lated subjects with respect to the philosophy of causation: conceptual pluralism, a core causal concept of causation, the analysis of \what cau- sation is", epistemological pluralism, causation as a secondary quality and weak causal realism. The divide between metaphysical and epis- temological approaches to causation|and hence between philosophy and psychology|may be much smaller than is often presupposed. Keywords: philosophy of causation, developmental psychology, causal pluralism, interdisciplinarity

Citation KeyDeVreese2012
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